#DiverseAThon Sign-Up Post and TBR

I am so sad that the DA readathon is over because I loved its focus on diverse books and how all my book choices ended up being fantastic reads. So I’m signing right up to the next readathon which is also about diverse books.

The #DiverseAThon lasts for one week – starting on 22nd January – and while I know I won’t be able to read a lot during a work week, I think aiming for three books is doable. And to make it a little more challenging for myself, I’m going to pick three books that all feature a different type of diversity: one book by an Author of Color, one book featuring LGBTQ characters, and one book featuring an autistic character and written by an author with autism.

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My Diverse-a-thon TBR

Helen Oyeyemi – What is Not Yours is Not Yours

I adore Oyeyemi’s writing but so far I’ve only read two of her novels, never any of her short fiction. This short story collection sounds like just my cup of tea and, since I know I love the author’s style, I believe I’m in for a treat.

Playful, ambitious, and exquisitely imagined, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours is cleverly built around the idea of keys, literal and metaphorical. The key to a house, the key to a heart, the key to a secret—Oyeyemi’s keys not only unlock elements of her characters’ lives, they promise further labyrinths on the other side. In “Books and Roses” one special key opens a library, a garden, and clues to at least two lovers’ fates. In “Is Your Blood as Red as This?” an unlikely key opens the heart of a student at a puppeteering school. “‘Sorry’ Doesn’t Sweeten Her Tea” involves a “house of locks,” where doors can be closed only with a key—with surprising, unobservable developments. And in “If a Book Is Locked There’s Probably a Good Reason for That Don’t You Think,” a key keeps a mystical diary locked (for good reason).

Oyeyemi’s creative vision and storytelling are effervescent, wise, and insightful, and her tales span multiple times and landscapes as they tease boundaries between coexisting realities. Is a key a gate, a gift, or an invitation? What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours captivates as it explores the many possible answers.

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Molly Tanzer – Vermilion

The description to this book is so filled with buzzwords that I’ve been wanting to read it since it came out. A gunslinging heroine, the Weird West, ghosts, and (according to some reviews I read), a diverse cast of characters. What’s not to love?

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The Adventures of Lou Merriwether, Psychopomp

Gunslinging, chain smoking, Stetson-wearing Taoist psychopomp, Elouise “Lou” Merriwether might not be a normal 19-year-old, but she’s too busy keeping San Francisco safe from ghosts, shades, and geung si to care much about that. It’s an important job, though most folks consider it downright spooky. Some have even accused Lou of being more comfortable with the dead than the living, and, well… they’re not wrong.

When Lou hears that a bunch of Chinatown boys have gone missing somewhere deep in the Colorado Rockies she decides to saddle up and head into the wilderness to investigate. Lou fears her particular talents make her better suited to help placate their spirits than ensure they get home alive, but it’s the right thing to do, and she’s the only one willing to do it.

On the road to a mysterious sanatorium known as Fountain of Youth, Lou will encounter bears, desperate men, a very undead villain, and even stranger challenges. Lou will need every one of her talents and a whole lot of luck to make it home alive…

From British Fantasy Award nominee Molly Tanzer comes debut novel Vermilion, a spirited weird Western adventure that puts the punk back into steampunk.

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Corinne Duyvis – On the Edge of Gone

Now this is a big book! It’s a bit daunting to bit this on a readathon TBR but I’ve been wanting to read one of Duyvis’s books for a while now. The author was diagnosed with autism at a young age and this book also features an autistic character. I’m very curious to read it, so although her second novel (Otherbound) is shorter, I’m going with this one.

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January 29, 2035.

That’s the day the comet is scheduled to hit—the big one. Denise and her mother and sister, Iris, have been assigned to a temporary shelter near their hometown of Amsterdam to wait out the blast, but Iris is nowhere to be found, and at the rate Denise’s drug-addicted mother is going, they’ll never reach the shelter in time.

Then a last-minute encounter leads them to something better than a temporary shelter: a generation ship that’s scheduled to leave Earth behind and colonize new worlds after the comet hits. But each passenger must have a practical skill to contribute. Denise is autistic and fears that she’ll never be allowed to stay. Can she obtain a spot before the ship takes flight? What about her mother and sister?

When the future of the human race is at stake, whose lives matter most?

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I am very much looking forward to the #DiverseAThon, especially since there will be Twitter chats and loads of recommendations. And it’s not like you can ever have too many books.

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#DAreadathon Wrap-Up and Points

The DA Readathon is officially over and I have collected all my points as well as some thoughts about the experience.

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The short of it is: I loved everything about this challenge. As a readathon, it was casual enough, it lasted two weeks, and there was very little pressure (unless you count my personal ambition to collect lots of house points for Ravenclaw). My favorite part  was probably the reading prompts which corresponded with spells from the Harry Potter universe, and the fact that this readathon encouraged people to read diverse books.  Not only were these prompts accompanied by lovely graphics, they also give the readathon a bit of structure. They also helped me choose books. If your TBR is as big as mine, picking a handful of books can be quite overwhelming. Most of all, though, every book I read because of this readathon, has been fantastic and I’m so glad I participated.

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First of all, let’s see how many House points I’ve collected for Ravenclaw:

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Points for pages read:  101

  • Kissing the Witch: 228
  • Labyrinth Lost: 336
  • Six of Crows: 285
  • Borderline: 168

As you get one point for every 10 pages read, I added the “left-over” pages up until I reached another 10.
So for Kissing the Witch, I get 22 points, plus 8 left-over pages. For Labyrinth Lost I got 33 points, plus 6 pages. Those 6 added to the 8 pages from Kissing the Witch make 14 pages which got me another point (and 4 left-over pages). And so on. I hope I interpreted the rules correctly here. Otherwise, somebody let me know, please.

Points for books finished:  10

  • Emma Donoghue – Kissing the Witch
  • Zoraida Córdova – Labyrinth Lost

Points for reviews posted: 10

Points for social media: 5

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Now to the books I’ve read, started and didn’t get to:

I finished two books and reviewed both of them. They were both fantastic reads by new-to-me authors.

Emma Donoghue’s Kissing the Witch is a short story collection which retells well-known fairy tales, but with a lesbian twist. The connections between the stories may not have made a lot of sense but the stories themselves were wonderful, sometimes dark reads.

Zoraida Córdova’s Labyrinth Lost was just lovely all around. Lacking a bit in characterisation, the book had great world building, a bisexual protagonist, an intriguing magic system, and a wonderful depiction of family! I really loved it and can’t wait for the sequel.

I almost finished two more books. These are very, very different reads, but I fell in love with them equally.

I don’t think I need to say much about Leigh Bardugo’s Six of Crows as everybody except for me seems to have read it. I’m in the last third of that book and by now, I know this thieving crew well enough to be quite emotionally invested.

Mishell Baker’s Borderline, on the other hand, is something I usually wouldn’t read. It’s Urban Fantasy set in Hollywood, featuring a disabled, mentally ill protagonist who tried to kill herself. If I hadn’t read a ton of great reviews, I would have said that’s a bit much for one book. But it works beautifully. Millie’s Borderline Personality Disorder is always there, but it never gets “in the way” of the plot, if you know what I mean. This is not an “issue book” like they made you read in school. It’s a great mystery with an unusual Urban Fantasy world – in that I haven’t met any werewolves yet – and the protagonist’s voice is so wonderful, it’s hard to put the book down. I read about half of that book during the readathon.

Unfortunately, because work left me too tired to read on most days, here are the books I didn’t get to. But I am determined to just continue reading them as if the readathon was still going on, I just won’t award myself any House points. 🙂

  • Madeline Miller – Song of Achilles
    This book tells the love story between Achilles and Patroclus and I hear tissues are needed for reading this.
  • Nicola Griffith – Hild
    A historical fantasy featuring a kick-ass heroine? Sign me up. Also, I heard this is a slow, more character-driven book and while some people don’t like those, it’s totally my thing.
  • Siliva Moreno-Garcia – Signal to Noise
    I am so looking forward to this story, set in 80ies Mexico City. I heard it’s magical realism and there’s lots of music (thus the cover), and that sounds like it could be amazing!

Thanks to Read at Midnight for the amazing challenge. I hope you will host this readathon (or a similar one) again next year!

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#DAReadAThon

Hello, New Year! It’s nice to meet you. Let me welcome you by collecting lots of House Points for Ravenclaw during the Dumbledore’s Army Read-A-Thon (hosted by Read at Midnight).

Here’s my challenge ID card:

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I particularly look forward to this read-a-thon because it promotes diverse books, it lasts for two whole weeks, and it gives us Potter nerds a chance to show our House pride. I have prepared a list of books to tackle for the challenge – each of them is matched with a spell from the Potter universe. More details about the books I chose to read, what spell they correspond with, and how I like them, below.

Let the reading begin!

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da-readathon-points

There are several ways to collect House points, the most obvious one of which is reading! Per 10 pages read, you gain your house 1 point and if you finish a book, that’s an additional 5 points. A review for the DA Readathon gets you another 5 points. But you can also collect points on social media by tweeting about current reads or giving book recommendations. The same goes for Instagram photos of your TBR or current #DAReadathon book.

Points for pages read:  101

  • Kissing the Witch: 228
  • Labyrinth Lost: 336
  • Six of Crows: 285
  • Borderline: 168

Points for books finished:  10

  • Emma Donoghue – Kissing the Witch
  • Zoraida Córdova – Labyrinth Lost

Points for reviews posted: 10

Points for social media: 5

POINTS EARNED FOR RAVENCLAW: 126

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dareadathon-expecto-patronum

My first book has been chosen and it is Kissing the Witch by Emma Donoghue. This means I’m starting my Dumbledore’s Army readathon with the Patronus charm.

This book retells all the most famous fairy tales with a lesbian twist. Because I have loved fairy tales for as long as I can think, I consider this topic one of personal significance. I’ve never read anything by Emma Donoghue before but, so far, I really like what she’s done with the Grimms’ tales.

kissing the witch

Each short story ends with one character asking a second one about how they came to be where they are. And then they tell their story. In that story, they, in turn, ask someone else about their past, and so it goes on and on. I already have some issues with how everything fits together (because it doesn’t) but the stories themselves are lovely! Sometimes, we read about the princesses, sometimes the villains, but the story, although familiar, is never quite what you’d expect.

January 1st: Because this is rather a short book, I managed to finish it on the first day of the readathon. I hope I’ll have a review up by next week. On to my next spell…

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dareadthon-lumos

My Lumos book is Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova and I cannot wait to get started. A lot of people had this book on their readathon TBR, so I guess we’ll all be sort of buddy reading it, which makes this even more fun.

labyrinth-lost

What convinced me to read this book next was the gorgeous cover and the fantastic map at the beginning. It looks dark and creepy and just like my kind of (under?)world – I just couldn’t resist. At 336 pages, this will take me a bit longer than my first book but I am super motivated to read all 7 books for the readathon.

January 2nd: Okay, so I totally love this! After only one chapter, I already feel at home in this family of brujas. The sisters are adorable and just like sisters should be. Fighting over favorite clothes, who gets to use the bathroom first, but a loving family nonetheless. I cannot wait to find out everything that’s going on here.

January 5th: I couldn’t read very much these last days because work is… well, work. It makes me fall asleep as soon as I see my bed. No time for reading. But tomorrow is a holiday so I’ll have the entire long weekend to catch up. Labyrinth Lost continues to be wonderful. In fact, it’s getting better and better. I love Alejandra, the protagonist (and her family!), and I also really, really enjoy the potential love interests. I see two characters with potential, either of them may become a romantic partner, or neither of them. But the not knowing makes this  a highly refreshing book.

Evening: Aaaaand I’m home from work and have officially started my weekend. I am starting to seriously love this book even though I only read a few pages on the train today.

January 8th: So, I’m almost done with this book (still loving it) but I didn’t have a lot of time to read any other DA readathon books. On the upside, I finally went to see Rogue One on Saturday and it was much better than I expected. Plus, I still have to finish reading Flashfall, which I started very late last year and which, although very exciting at first, has kind of run out of steam by now.
However, I’m pretty sure I’ll have a review of Labyrinth Lost up next week and hopefully finish the rest of my readathon books.

January 10th: I finished this book yesterday and although I saw one part of the ending coming, I loved it to bits. The feeling of family, the warmth of friendship, and watching Alex come of age was just beautiful. My review is now online!

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dareadathon-stupefy

 

I also couldn’t resist any longer and started Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. I picked it because of the hype surrounding the duology and again, just two chapters in, I am so hooked I want to just stay home all week and read this book!

six-of-crows

January 2nd: I had only ever read the first Grisha book by Leigh Bardugo before but if Six of Crows continues to be as good as its first chapters, I believe I’ve been missing out. Holy shit, how can I like both Inej and Kaz so much after one short encounter?

January 5th: As much as I adore Labyrinth Lost, I think it’s time to switch it up a bit and continue this amazeballs book! I still don’t know what the plot is really going to be about but I adore the characters so far.

January 11th: This is so much fun. Kaz is gathering a crew for his big job and you’d think the introduction of each character would be boring but it’s not. Bardugo uses the time for world-building as well as showing us who these guys are. I already have trouble picking a favorite (I was just introduced to Matthias) but I adore the names used in this novel. Ketterdam, the Barrel, the Dregs… names and places aren’t just words here – they have meaning and they paint pictures in your head. So even if you don’t get a description of the Dregs, you still get the idea that it’s not a nice place, that it’s a dark underbelly sort of area of the city. Just because of its name. Well done, Leigh Bardugo!

January 14th: OMG, there is so much going on here! While I am excited to see how the group will get the job done, what I find infinitely more interesting is the relationships between the members of the group. First of all – Nina and Inej, the only two girls, are friends. I love it. I love how effortlessy normal they are, how they are nice to each other, care about each other. I just hope they don’t become part of a love triangle, but  so far I trust Leigh Bardugo.
Nina and Matthias also have a… weird thing going on. These two are totally in love, I am sure of it even though it was never stated. But he also wants to kill her? And she got him sent to prison? Talk about baggage. I finally have reading time, and it’s wonderful to dive into this world for an hour or two without interruptions.

January 15th: I’ve read more than half of this book but I don’t think I can finish it in time. Plus, during a Twitter chat, somebody massively spoiled part of the story and now I’m reading certain chapters thinking about nothing else but that spoiler. It’s like a big cloud of doom hanging over the book. However, the book is still fun, and I hope that spoiled one wasn’t the only twist that’s coming up.

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da-readathon-expelliarmus

Because I can’t ever read just one book at a time, I had to start with my next Hogwarts spell right after finishing the last book and while still reading Six of Crows. Because that book is so immersive, I wanted something with a completely different world and tone, where I couldn’t possible mix up the stories in my brain. And here it is:

borderline

From what I’ve heard of this novel – and I have only heard good things – the protagonist has a failed suicide attempt in her past, lost both legs, and has Borderline Personality Disorder. If that doesn’t sound intriguing, I don’t know what does. And after reading the first few pages, I am already in love with the voice. Plus, I read about disabled characters so rarely, it’s about time to expand my horizons. Let’s get our Expelliarmus on, right?

January 11th: I read the first few chapters before bed yesterday and I am so surprised. Urban Fantasy is usually not my thing, because I just can’t read about another snarky, yet super sexy and capable, fighting machine heroine anymore who solves crimes with werewolves and vampires. But this? This is awesome! I can safely say I have never read about a character like Millie and although we have nothing in common, I love reading about her.

January 14th: This is a fantastic book! I only wish I’d had more energy during the last few days to actually read. Now that the weekend is finally here, I’ll need to get my butt in gear and catch up a little. I love Millie’s narration, I find the world fascinating, but I was so exhausted after work every day of the week that I only read a chapter or two before bed.

As much as this is a page-turner, I’ve been spending most of my time with Six of Crows, so I only read about a third of Borderline. Another book I won’t be able to finish during the readathon. But not only do I look forward to reading the rest of it, I am already eyeing the sequel which will come out this year.

January 15th: I’m a bit confused about the rules of the readathon. If today is still included in the challenge, I might just have a shot at finishing another book. Wish me luck!

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Let’s start 2017 with a Read-a-thon – #DAReadAThon Sign-Up Post

I haven’t posted very much lately because all my time is taken up by catching up on all those unread books and, you know, the usual Christmas madness. And while I am pretty sure I’ll have to admit defeat by the end of the month (so many challenges unfinished), I intend to start the new year with a bang and read-a-thon right into 2017!

When I found this awesome challenge hosted by Aentee at Read at Midnight I knew I had to join.

The Dumbledore’s Army Read-a-Thon

Here’s what you need to know:

  • it runs from January 1st through January 15th 2017
  • it gives you great prompts on how to choose your books (more on that below)
    • the prompts are inspired by Harry Potter spells, which is so awesome!
  • it promotes the reading of diverse books
  • you can collect points for your Hogwarts house!!! (gamification works on me, I guess)
    • you get points for reading and for interacting with others on social media

And here’s my official sign-up card and a list of books I’m going to read for the seven prompts.

dina da-readathon

Choosing the books was super difficult because I want to read All The Things but I think I’ve got a pretty good lineup here. In case you’re participating and still looking for a good book to read, I added descriptions from Goodreads.dareadathon-stupefy

I think it’s safe to say that Leigh Bardugo’s Six of Crows has taken the internet by storm. When people wouldn’t stop posting about it and its sequel, I knew I had to have those books. The duology is sitting on my shelf, looking all pretty, and eagerly awaiting January. As far as I know, it features characters suffering from PTSD.

six-of-crows

Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can’t pull it off alone…

A convict with a thirst for revenge
A sharpshooter who can’t walk away from a wager
A runaway with a privileged past
A spy known as the Wraith
A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums
A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes

Kaz’s crew are the only ones who might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

da-readathon-protego

I don’t think I’ve ever read a book by a Mexicon author or set in Mexico and Siliva Moreno-Garcia’s Signal to Noise has been on my radar ever since it came out. Mexico City, music, the 80ies! What’s not to look forward to? Plus, look at that new cover with its incredible Stranger Things vibe… it’s the font, I know, but it totally makes me want to pick it up right now and read it.

A literary fantasy about love, music and sorcery, set against the background of Mexico City.
Mexico City, 1988: Long before iTunes or MP3s, you said “I love you” with a mixtape. Meche, awkward and fifteen, has two equally unhip friends — Sebastian and Daniela — and a whole lot of vinyl records to keep her company. When she discovers how to cast spells using music, the future looks brighter for the trio. With help from this newfound magic, the three friends will piece together their broken families, change their status as non-entities, and maybe even find love…
Mexico City, 2009: Two decades after abandoning the metropolis, Meche returns for her estranged father’s funeral. It’s hard enough to cope with her family, but then she runs into Sebastian, and it revives memories from her childhood she thought she buried a long time ago. What really happened back then? What precipitated the bitter falling out with her father? And, is there any magic left?

da-readathon-expelliarmus

The marginalised group that I almost never read about is characters with disabilities. I thought about two different books to choose for this prompt (Corinne Duyvis – On the Edge of Gone and Mishell Baker – Borderline) but in the end, I am going with Borderline because my gut tells me to and because I really meant to read this book in 2016 and never got around to it.

borderline

A year ago, Millie lost her legs and her filmmaking career in a failed suicide attempt. Just when she’s sure the credits have rolled on her life story, she gets a second chance with the Arcadia Project: a secret organization that polices the traffic to and from a parallel reality filled with creatures straight out of myth and fairy tales.
For her first assignment, Millie is tasked with tracking down a missing movie star who also happens to be a nobleman of the Seelie Court. To find him, she’ll have to smooth-talk Hollywood power players and uncover the surreal and sometimes terrifying truth behind the glamour of Tinseltown. But stronger forces than just her inner demons are sabotaging her progress, and if she fails to unravel the conspiracy behind the noble’s disappearance, not only will she be out on the streets, but the shattering of a centuries-old peace could spark an all-out war between worlds.
No pressure.

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My initial idea was to finally read something by Kameron Hurley but then I decided to go with another book that I’ve owned since it was published and that I desperately want to read. So my pick is Hild by Nicola Griffith.

hild

A brilliant, lush, sweeping historical novel about the rise of the most powerful woman of the Middle Ages: Hild.
Hild is born into a world in transition. In seventh-century Britain, small kingdoms are merging, usually violently. A new religion is coming ashore; the old gods’ priests are worrying. Edwin of Northumbria plots to become overking of the Angles, ruthlessly using every tool at his disposal: blood, bribery, belief.
Hild is the king’s youngest niece. She has the powerful curiosity of a bright child, a will of adamant, and a way of seeing the world—of studying nature, of matching cause with effect, of observing human nature and predicting what will happen next—that can seem uncanny, even supernatural, to those around her. She establishes herself as the king’s seer. And she is indispensable—until she should ever lead the king astray. The stakes are life and death: for Hild, her family, her loved ones, and the increasing numbers who seek the protection of the strange girl who can read the world and see the future.
Hild is a young woman at the heart of the violence, subtlety, and mysticism of the early medieval age—all of it brilliantly and accurately evoked by Nicola Griffith’s luminous prose. Recalling such feats of historical fiction as Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Sigrid Undset’s Kristin Lavransdatter, Hild brings a beautiful, brutal world—and one of its most fascinating, pivotal figures, the girl who would become St. Hilda of Whitby—to vivid, absorbing life.

dareadathon-impedimenta

This prompt is screaming for Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles, a book telling the love story between Achilles and Patroclus. I bought this when it was new but even though the book is pretty slim, I always felt a little daunted. Now it’s time to finally read it.

song-of-achilles

Greece in the age of heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to the court of King Peleus and his perfect son Achilles. Despite their difference, Achilles befriends the shamed prince, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something deeper – despite the displeasure of Achilles’ mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess.

But when word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped, Achilles must go to war in distant Troy and fulfill his destiny. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus goes with him, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

dareadathon-expecto-patronum

Whew! This is a hard one. Since I don’t want to get too personal here, I chose a book that encompasses my childhood and there is nothing that screams “Dina’s childhood” more than fairy tales. If you’ve followed this blog for any amount of time, you’ll know about my slight obsession with this type of story. Finding a fairy tale retelling that also features diverse characters is a always worth a little victory dance. To mix things up, I’m going for a story collection instead of a novel: Emma Donoghue – Kissing the Witch

kissing the witch

Thirteen tales are unspun from the deeply familiar, and woven anew into a collection of fairy tales that wind back through time. Acclaimed Irish author Emma Donoghue reveals heroines young and old in unexpected alliances–sometimes treacherous, sometimes erotic, but always courageous. Told with luminous voices that shimmer with sensuality and truth, these age-old characters shed their antiquated cloaks to travel a seductive new landscape, radiantly transformed. Cinderella forsakes the handsome prince and runs off with the fairy godmother; Beauty discovers the Beast behind the mask is not so very different from the face she sees in the mirror; Snow White is awakened from slumber by the bittersweet fruit of an unnamed desire. Acclaimed writer Emma Donoghue spins new tales out of old in a magical web of thirteen interconnected stories about power and transformation and choosing one’s own path in the world. In these fairy tales, women young and old tell their own stories of love and hate, honor and revenge, passion and deception. Using the intricate patterns and oral rhythms of traditional fairy tales, Emma Donoghue wraps age-old characters in a dazzling new skin.

dareadthon-lumos

I browsed through other participants’ TBRs for this challenge to find recommendations for books I haven’t thought of myself, and I came across this post. Isabella is going to read Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova and now, so am I. Thanks for helping me pick my last book for the read-a-thon. I am super excited to start reading.

labyrinth-lost

Nothing says Happy Birthday like summoning the spirits of your dead relatives.
I fall to my knees. Shattered glass, melted candles and the outline of scorched feathers are all that surround me. Every single person who was in my house – my entire family — is gone.
Alex is a bruja, the most powerful witch in a generation…and she hates magic. At her Deathday celebration, Alex performs a spell to rid herself of her power. But it backfires. Her whole family vanishes into thin air, leaving her alone with Nova, a brujo boy she can’t trust. A boy whose intentions are as dark as the strange markings on his skin.
The only way to get her family back is to travel with Nova to Los Lagos, a land in-between, as dark as Limbo and as strange as Wonderland…
Beautiful Creatures meets Daughter of Smoke and Bone with an infusion of Latin American tradition in this highly original fantasy adventure.

I can’t wait to get started and dive into all these wonderful books. And if I can win some house points for Ravenclaw in the process, that makes it all the better.

What about you? Are you going to participate? If yes, what house are you reading for. I’ve seen some Slytherin and Hufflepuff sign-ups so far as well as a few fellow Ravenclaws, but surprisingly no Gryffindors yet.

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Top Ten Tuesday – My Fall TBR List

As I’m home sick and need some distraction anyway, I thought I’d do a Top Ten Tuesday again. The Broke and the Bookish have come up with another great topic that will hopefully help me organise my reading a litte. As much as I love making lists, I rarely adhere to them and just end up reading whatever falls into my hands.

top-ten-tuesday

My Fall TBR list

this-savage-song1.Victoria Schwab – This Savage Song

Schwab disappointed me a bit with her sequel A Gathering of Shadows but I am still convinced that she’s got an awesome brain and comes up with great stories and characters. So I want to see what her latest novel – also the first in a series – is all about.

I know it’s about humans and monsters (and how they are not always what they seem) and music, and all of those sound pretty good. Plus, the title is brilliant.

bone swans2. C.S.E. Cooney – Bone Swans

I was so incredibly excited when I heard this was coming out and then I immediately got it and then… it’s been kind of sitting on my shelf. I’ve been waiting for the right moment to read it, wanting to really savor it. Cooney is still new to me but I have a suspicion that she might become a new favorite author. Everything I’ve heard about her and this collection is so up my alley that I will be majorly disappointed if I don’t fall in love with it hard.

haunting of hill house3. Shirley Jackson – The Haunting of Hill House

I said last year I wouldn’t wait around for another Halloween before I read my next Shirley Jackson book, but as new books came out, I ended up doing just that. The disctractions were too great, you guys. I don’t care, I’m going to read this creepy thing in October because I am still haunted by We Have Always Lived in the Castle and need more Shirley Jackson in my life.

shakespeares-star-wars-trilogy4. Ian Doescher – William Shakespeare’s Star Wars

Until this post goes up I may well have finished the trilogy already, but in case there’s still some returning Jedi left over, this goes on my Fall TBR. I mainly like these books for the illustrations and the little nods to Shakespeare. They are quick reads, they make me giggle at the Shakespearean version of famous Star Wars quotes and they are a fun way to revisit the Star Wars trilogy (I will most likely skip the prequels because why would I put myself into the pain of revisiting those stories without the one thing that made it bearable – the visual effects?).

bird-and-the-sword5. Amy Harmon – The Bird and the Sword

I stumbled across this book by accident but it sounds super-intriguing. The cover is mysterious, the synopsis makes me expect all sorts of mysteries, and magic, and myth. It might be totally not my taste but, hell, until I’ll try I won’t know, right?

Swallow, daughter, pull them in, those words that sit upon your lips. Lock them deep inside your soul, hide them ‘til they’ve time to grow. Close your mouth upon the power, curse not, cure not, ‘til the hour. You won’t speak and you won’t tell, you won’t call on heaven or hell. You will learn and you will thrive. Silence, daughter. Stay alive.

siege-and-storm6. Leigh Bardugo – Siege and Storm

I actually really, really want to read Six of Crows but because I’m weird and organised in my reading life (if nowhere else), I started the Grisha Trilogy first and intend to finish it before reading Bardugo’s other series. So Siege and Storm is up next and I have high hopes for it. While Shadow and Bone drifted off a little too much into YA-trope-land, I believe there is serious potential here and I quite liked the writing style. So let’s do this and do it quickly, then I can finally get into Six of Crows.

bands-of-mourning7. Brandon Sanderson – The Bands of Mourning

I am waiting for the Graphic Audio adaptations to come out (part one September 28th, part two October 26th) although I’ve had the physical book here since it came out. As my experience with Graphic Audio Sandersons go, I will probably eat this up in one weekend and it will probably be the first weekend after the entire audiobook is published. After that, I can start listening to the first part(s) of Words of Radiance as well, so the rest of 2016 looks very promising.

bryony-and-roses8. T. Kingfisher – Bryony and Roses

I am utterly in love with T. Kingfisher’s writing and the way she turns fairy tales into something new. Her collection Toad Words was lovely, and her novel The Seventh Bride both terrified and delighted me. I need more of that. Plus, the books are usually not very big (that’s a plus because I’ve started a few large series lately and feel quite intimidated by the page count).

three-dark-crowns9. Kendare Blake – Three Dark Crowns

I don’t own this book yet (as of writing this post) and I am on the fence about everything. But throw a cool book trailer at me, a gorgeous cover, and some buzz words in the description and I’m willing to try. So far, this sounds like Royal Hunger Games with magic – and that’s a pretty cool idea.

I know about Blake’s other series (Anna Dressed in Blood and the sequel) but I haven’t read it – don’t think I will either. The problem with these over-hyped books is that lots of people may end up liking them (see Sarah J. Maas) but I just can’t take the clichés and tropes anymore. I’m hoping for the best.

10. EVERYTHING ELSE by EVERYONE

I have SO MANY books on my TBR and I want to read at least half of them right this very moment. I can’t possibly pick only one for my last book, so I’m making a list within a list. That’s allowed, right?

  1. Carolyn Turgeon – Godmother
  2. Foz Meadows – An Accident of Stars
  3. Silvia Moreno-Garcia – Signal to Noise
  4. N. K. Jemisin – The Obelisk Gate (OMG, I forgot this one, I’m totally reading this, no matter what, this should be number 1!!!)
  5. Laure Eve – The Graces
  6. Indra Das – The Devourers
  7. Sarah J. Maas – A Court of Mist and Fury (started it already but it’s painfully bad, so I’ll read this if I’m in the mood for a ranty review…)
  8. Karin Tidbeck – Jagannath
  9. Nicole Kornher-Stace – Archivist Wasp
  10. Roshani Chokshi – The Star-Touched Queen

 

 

 

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Bout of Books 17 – Updates

It’s time for another bout of books. I actually did really well last week with catching up on some books (reviews are coming), but hey, Bout of Books is always a fun challenge. Plus, 2016 has been a very good year with lots of interesting titles coming out and I haven’t even read half the new publications I wanted to.

Bout of Books

As I mentioned in my sign-up post, I will be doing things differently this time. Instead of daily updates I will simply update whenever I have time or something to say.  I’m curious to see how that goes but I think it will take some pressure off and give me more time to concentrate on the books. Speaking of books: I said I’d probably read Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo but I kind of finished that book yesterday. Here’s some books I might be reading this week:


Number of books read: 1
Challenges done:

Books read:

  • Marissa Meyer – Stars Above

Here is the general update area where I will post my thoughts on current reads, challenges, the Twitter chat and anything else to do with Bout of Books. This post will remain a sticky until Bout of Book is over.

Monday

I’m reading Marissa Meyer’s Stars Above and while it’s nothing groundbreaking, this is just a nice world to flee into when reality is too depressing. I am halfway done with this book, but I admit I skipped the stories that I had previously read – some of them were available for free online or in Meyer’s newsletter. If anyone’s interested, I talked about them here.

Tuesday

I was just tired. All day, whenever you asked me, I could have fallen asleep on the spot. So I almost finished Stars Above but there’s still a few pages left. However, I also started another book – An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir. So far, it was pretty good – a harsh and cruel beginning to what I hope will turn out to be a great story.

Wednesday

I’m really liking An Ember in the Ashes. Maybe since the Hunger Games, YA authors dare to write about darker stuff. The beginning was pretty grimdark. Stars Above continues to be fun and fluffy, just how I expected. A wedding is about to happen and the characters all behave pretty much exactly as they should. If I manage to finish this book today (and as I’m not as tired as yesterday I’m pretty sure I will) then I have to pick a new book. Aaaaaah, exciting!

Friday

I’m so excited!! Okay, first the book stuff. I finished Stars Above and, surprisingly, my favorite new story was the one about young Scarlet and her grandmother. That one actually got to me emotionally. The wedding story (not telling whose wedding) made me giggle, but overall it wasn’t very good. Kind of exactly what I expected and I would have preferred to be surprised. But oh well, it was fun. An Ember in the Ashes is still pretty good, although I didn’t read very much yesterday or today.

In non-bookish info (or only slightly book-related, at least), I got my very first subscription boxes this week. If I have time to take nice pictures, I may write a post or two about them, but in general, I love the idea of surprise boxes. I got The Bookish Box by Appraising pages and Nerdy Bookworm Box – both were filled with excellen things. A T-shirt, a Peter Pan necklace which I adore (it’s a thimble and an acorn that represent the “kisses” Peter Pan and Wendy give each other), a mug, wax melts that smell wonderfully like the outdoors, a Hunger Games themed coffee, adorable magnetic bookmarks… you see, I’m in book-lover heaven.

As it’s finally weekend, I can now properly dive into An Ember in the Ashes and read more than a couple of chapters per day. I have also picked my next/parallel read and, surprising probably nobody, it’s none of the books I planned on reading. It is Vigil by the inimitable, wonderful, original Angela Slatter. More on that tomorrow.

SUNDAY

So okay, An Ember in the Ashes has taken over. I loved the beginning of Vigil, but I need to read that other book first. There is now spying involved. I haven’t done any challenges this week (although I loved the idea of the headlines challenge), because – and I think that’s a good thing – I was reading most of the time.

I will use the rest of this Sunday to finish the second part in An Ember in the Ashes, and then call it a day. Since my goals for this read-a-thon were very modest, I am happy with the way it went. I finished one book, got way into another one, started a third, and I have some reviews in the pipeline. I already look forward to the next Bout of Books and I hope it will happen during a week where I don’t have to work. Then I can really set myself some ambitious goals. 🙂

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Bout of Books 17 – Sign-Up and Goals

It’s been very quiet around here. I’ve been reading some big books, and then some devastating books, and then some audiobooks – all of which were (and still are) hard to review. But it’s time to get back on track. My Goodreads page tells me I’m way behind on the reading challenge and my spreadsheet makes me do the shame-walk from Game of Thrones every time I check up on my stats. So it’s time for Bout of Books again.

Bout of Books

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda @ On a Book Bender and Kelly @ Reading the Paranormal. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, August 22nd and runs through Sunday, August 28th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 17 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books team

I am in again, ever the optimist, hoping to catch up both on reading books as well as reviewing some. As always, I look forward to the twitter chats and the challenges and being jealous of how fast some of you people read. 🙂


Goals

I’ll be a bit more modest with my goals this time. The way I’ve lagged behind on… pretty much everything, I’ll be glad to read one book and write a couple of reviews. I’ll also change my update posts’ format, because writing those up every day takes away precious reading time, and sometimes I just don’t have anything to say.

  • finish current read
  • read one more book
  • review both
  • if there’s time, throw in a comic book

That’s it. These are my goals for the read-a-thon. I won’t specify a page number or pick the books I’m going to read ahead of time. I do have a feeling that Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone will be one of the books I read because I’ve been eyeing it for a while now and I’m really in the mood. But we’ll see how things go. Wish me luck and click the link above if you want to sign up also. It’s a lot of fun, I promise.

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Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books I Enjoyed That Have Under 2000 Ratings On Goodreads

This was much easier than expected. The Broke and The Bookish picked an excellent topic for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday. I love finding underrated and not-so-well-known books and I love telling others about all the underrated books that I know. Now, I’m not sure I interpreted the Goodreads ratings correctly because I only checked the number of ratings on whichever edition of a book I own (or whichever came up first). I’m sure if one adds the ratings on all available editions, all these books have more ratings but, honestly, I don’t know if Goodreads gives you that number and I was way too lazy to add the ratings up myself.

So I’ve included the number of ratings (of my edition) in brackets next to each title to show you just how unloved these gems are. I also linked to my review if I wrote one. Seriously though, pick these books up, they’re all excellent!

My Top Ten Books With Less than 2000 Ratings on Goodreads

Angela Slatter – Sourdough (82 ratings) and The Bitterwood Bible (73 ratings)

Oh my god, you don’t know what you’re missing! Angela Slatter is an Australian author who weaves the most beautiful fairytale-esque stories you can imagine. Her two short story collections are much more than just some short stories put together. They actually tell a much larger story. In Sourdough every story gives you a new puzzle piece about the history of a place and its inhabitants. The Bitterwood Bible spins this further (although it is a sort of prequel), with recurring characters, intertwining stories, and lots of fantastic female characters. I love these books to bits and urge you to get yourself an ebook copy – they’re affordable and available worldwide. Yay for the internet!

Régis Loisel – Peter Pan(434 ratings)

I suppose French comics aren’t read very widely and my own interest in them comes from having lived in France for a while. But if you like Peter Pan and comics, this is for you. Loisel gives J. M. Barrie’s story a new spin and although there are many recognisable characters and plot points, this is not the children’s story you remember. It is brutal, devastating, not for kids, and absolutely heartbreaking. The six-part series is completed so you won’t have to wait for sequels either. So pick it up.

Theodora Goss – In the Forest of Forgetting (615 ratings)

Another short story collection that deserves to be better known. Theodora Goss has a distinctly lyrical, fairy tale style that makes the most mundane things seem magical. The titular story is one of the most beautiful things I have ever read, and some of her other tales stuck in my mind, refusing to let go.

Luiz Eduardo de Oliveira (Leo) – Aldebaran (161 ratings)

Another comic book series, yippie! Aldebaran is a science fiction comic and I’ll be honest with you – I’m not a huge fan of the artwork. But the story, now that’s quite brilliant. A village on Aldebaran is devastated by some sort of natural (or not so natural?) catastrophe, so the survivors set out to find what happened and to make a new home for themselves. They discover way more than they thought was possible. This is a story that spans years and many miles, and while I may not love the art, Leo came up with some incredible flora and fauna for his planet. It is well worth checking out.

Sarah Pinborough – Poison (1869 ratings), Charm (1150 ratings), and Beauty (1071 ratings)

Anyone who loves fairy tales and retellings should pick up these three short novels. The titles tell you which fairy tale they’re about (Snow White, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty respectively), but these are twisted, more adult versions of the stories you know. They are connected and you only get the full ending if you read them all, but you can also pick up each book on its own and enjoy it. With covers like these, I honestly don’t understand why they don’t have more ratings.

Ysabeau S. Wilce – Flora’s Dare (1217 ratings), Flora’s Fury (685 ratings), and Prophecies, Libels & Dreams (97 ratings)

The first book in the adorable, original, quirky Flora series has more than 2000 ratings on Goodreads but for some reason (I think I know which) people don’t continue reading. The first book is very childish, although it already shows the greatness that is Ysabeau Wilce and her imagination. House ghosts, magical boots, an Aztec-inspired Empire, and in the middle of it a young girl who just doesn’t want to join the military like her parents, but wants to be a ranger. I adore Flora and Flora’s Dare is by far the best book in the series. If you’re unconvinced, try the short story collection set in the same world – algthough featuring other characters. I am still hoping for sequels.

Catherynne M. Valente – Speak Easy (258 ratings), Radiance (1438 ratings), and Six-Gun Snow White (1818 ratings)

Okay, so Radiance is still pretty new and has been getting nothing but rave reviews. I know reading a Valente book can be a big leap. Her language is demanding and beautiful, her subject matter varies from whimsical fairy tales to deeply difficult themes. In Speak Easy, a novella, it is the language that makes the book so great. That is, until the ending. That ending destroyed me.
Six-Gun Snow White was hard to read simply because the main character is put into such a horrible position and her stepmother mistreats her, all under the guise of love and care. But it is also an amazing twist on the Snow White story, seven “dwarves” and all.
Radiance is perfect. That’s all I have to say.

Nalo Hopkinson – Midnight Robber (1274 ratings)

Another book that gains a part of its appeal through language. Written in patois, it isn’t easy to get into if (like me) you were unfamiliar with that way of speaking. But I love discovering new languages and this felt like such an organic way to speak English, it took me a couple of chapters and I was all in. The story itself is breathtaking, a mix of science fiction and coming of age story with Caribbean influences. It was the first Hopkinson book I read and I can promise you that although this is my favorite so far, she is a fantastic writer to follow.

Karin Lowachee – Warchild (1459 ratings)

Any book that can pull off even a single chapter written in second person singular deserves a chance. In the best cases, you don’t even notice that the book is written in second person. This was the case in Warchild – and don’t worry, only the beginning is written about “you” – and it made the life-defining things that happen to the protagonist all the more immediate and touching. The title keeps its promise and Lowachee does tell the story of a Warchild. Someone born in war, swept up in it, fighting in it, and suffering everything that comes with it. This was a deeply moving, closely drawn portrait of a young boy growing up. It also has cool aliens and space battles.

Genevieve Valentine – Mechanique (2002 ratings)

Ok, so I’m cheating a bit because this book actually has ever so slightly more than 2000 ratings, BUT it doesn’t have nearly as many ratings as it deserves. I think Genevieve Valentine’s genius is slowly becoming more appreciated but I suppose few people go back to her novel Méchanique, a book that broke my heart so many ways I stopped counting. The premise is the story of a strange travelling circus – so far, so ordinary. Except everyone in this circus seems to have secrets, carry emotional baggage, or fight silent feuds against other circus members. Finding these secrets in a steampunky world was just amazing. Plus, Valentine throws in sentences that say so much more than an entire other novel would. She knows excatly what she’s doing with language and for that Méchanique is still my favorite of her stories.


Also, yes, these are a bit more than ten books, but I’ve grouped them all nicely for you so I’m sure you’ll let it slide. Plus, that just means more great reading for you guys. Now I can’t wait to discover all the books I’ve never heard about that others are recommending. There’s still room on my wishlist, after all.

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Top Ten Tuesday – Ten Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed

This week’s topic of Top Ten Tuesday (hosted by The Broke and the Bookish) is just up my alley. There are many books that I like while reading them, but then, a few months later, when I think about them, I have very different feelings about them. The same thing happens in reverse. Certain books don’t seem like much when I read them, but they grow in esteem, they get stuck in my mind, I think about them long after reading them. Because this has definitely happened to me, I picked some examples of both changed-for-the-better and changed-for-the-worse books. I only came up with seven examples, though.

Seven Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed

old man's war1. John Scalzi – Old Man’s War

Here’s a book that was a lot of fun while it lasted. However, not even long after finishing, I couldn’t remember the characters’ names or, indeed, many plot points. The fact that so very, very little of the plot or characters stuck with me makes me like the book less in retrospect. I now think of it as fluffy, forgettable science fiction. Nonetheless, I do know that reading it was enjoyable.

2. Mira Grant – Feedfeed

Similar (but not quite) to the Scalzi book, I enjoyed some of this zombie novel. It was incredibly slow to start, most of the plot points were sorely predictable, but the second half of the book was written really well, so I kept turning the pages. Now that some time has passed, all that book makes me think of is that it has one original idea – and a beautifully clever title – but otherwise lacks any depth.

3. Ellen Kushner – Swordspointswordspoint

I really have to re-read this book, especially with the Serial Box stories that were recently published. Swordspoint is the opposite example of the two books above. I read it in English when I was still rather shaky on my feet concerning the language, and that is an injustice to this book. Kushner’s language is beautiful and demands to be savored, something I just wasn’t able to at the time. But whenever I think back on the book, certain scenes stand out so clearly in my mind and make me want to go back to the world of Riverside. This book definitely grew on me over time and I intend to re-read it soon.

4. Alaya Dawn Johnson – The Summer Princesummer prince

I gave this book a pretty good rating right after I read it. But this is the prime example of books that’s don’t want to let go. I still think about the themes of the story, see the pyramid city of Palmares Tres in my mind, and happily remember the joy this book brought me. It was a good book when I read it, but I believe I did have some criticism. Now, all negative aspects have been forgotten (which doesn’t mean they aren’t there, just that my brain decided to filter them out) and all that remains in my mind is a perfect gem of a novel.

5. Naomi Novik – His Majesty’s Dragonhis majestys dragon

I don’t know what happened, but I didn’t like the first two Temeraire books very much. After having read – and ADORED – Uprooted, I’m starting to think it may have been my mood at the time. The parts of the book I can remember all sound good in my mind and I really don’t know what my problem was when I first read it, so I am making plans to re-read the two Temeraire books I have already read and then give the rest of the series a try as well. So here’s a book I didn’t like much when I read it but which I now think I should have loved.

6. Miyuki Miyabe – Ico: Castle in the Mistico1

I had a lot of problems with this book and I still remember them vividly. But, now that ploughing through the boring parts is in the past, I have to appreciate the author’s original ideas all the more. Thinking back, I just leave out the boring bits, and instead only remember the good parts, which makes me like this book a whole lot more than I did while I was actually reading it.

7. Juliet Marillier – Daughter of the Forestdaughter of the forest1

Due to the hype surrounding this book – at least in the places I go to for reviews and recommendations – I may have expected more than there is to it. So there was some disappointment when I finally read the book and it wasn’t what I expected. But over time, I have come to think of this story more fondly. Yes, it was a quiet book, but there are so many layers to it – and it is exactly these layers that keep coming up when I think about books I loved.


That’s it from me. What are some books that you changed your mind about long after reading them?

Bout of Books 16 – Updates

I’ve had all levels of success with the Bout of Books read-a-thon but even when I barely finish one book, I still enjoy this event so much that I can’t resist joining in. The Twitter chats are epic, the challenges a lot of fun, there are always new people to meet and blogs to follow. How could I say no to that?

bout of books banner

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda @ On a Book Bender and Kelly @ Reading the Paranormal. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, May 9th and runs through Sunday, May 15th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 16 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books team

Since I boasted about sticking to my goals and reading only the books I picked yesterday, I hope I won’t get distracted by all the new books on my shelves. My read-a-thon books are all choices I think I will love, so sticking to them shouldn’t be a problem. Now it’s all about reading as much as I can. May the read-a-thon begin!


MONDAY

Total books read: 
Total pages read:
 ~ 250
Pages read today: ~ 250
Books finished: 
Books I’m reading:

  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows
  • Bill Willingham – Fables Deluxe Edition: Volume 11

Notes:

I read last night before going to sleep and I’m counting that towards my pages for today (just because :)). The first 200 pages of Fables were pretty good, although it took me a while to remember all the things that happened previously. Still, I love seeing where this idea of fairy tale characters living in the real world has gone. After many, many issues, this is a whole new universe full of fairy tale awesome.

I’m now past the halfway point of A Gathering of Shadows and the plot is still slowly meandering. We’re building up to the big magic tournament but, so far, very little has actually happened. I enjoy reading about these characters but I’d seriously like stuff to happen soon.


TUESDAY

Total books read: 
Total pages read:
 ~ 373
Pages read today: ~ 123
Books finished:  0
Books I’m reading:

  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows
  • Bill Willingham – Fables Deluxe Edition: Volume 11

Notes:

What a stressful day! I was at work rathr long today and I’m afraid Wednesday will be the same. But, I managed to read Fables in the morning with my coffee and A Gathering of Shadows before sleep again.

In Fables, I am currently in the middle of a flashback about Snow White and Rose Red, which is fantastic. I feel like a child again, reading this old tale. And, to my delight, A Gathering of Shadows finally found its footing, the magical tournament has started and it is not very exciting. Taking more than half of a book to catch up and remind the readers of what happened previously is a bit long, mind you, but now that the action has begun, I’m quite happy.

I had no time for challenges today and if the week continues the way it started, I think I’ll have to postpone all challenges to the weekend.


WEDNESDAY

Total books read: 
Total pages read:
 ~ 425
Pages read today: ~ 52
Books finished: 
Books I’m reading:

  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows

Notes:

Today was an exhausting day at work. I got home later than planned and was too tired to read much. I mostly focused on A Gathering of Shadows because it got really good and I can’t stop reading.


THURSDAY

Total books read: 
Total pages read:
 ~ 437
Pages read today: ~ 12
Books finished: 
Books I’m reading:

  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows
  • Bill Willingham – Fables Deluxe Edition: Volume 11

Notes:

Another even more exhausting day at work. I am totally beat. I’ll crawl to the couch, fall down on it, and hope I can stay awake long enough to read a few pages. I have already started The Raven King on audiobook but I’m much too tired to concentrate properly. So I’ll definitely be doing most of my reading on the weekend. At my current pace, I’ll have a lot to catch up on.


FRIDAY

Total books read: 
Total pages read:
 ~ 594
Pages read today: ~ 157
Books finished: 
Books I’m reading:

  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows
  • Bill Willingham – Fables Deluxe Edition: Volume 11
  • Bill Willingham – Jack of Fables: The End (Volume 9)

Notes:

So yesterday, I read almost nothing. That sucks but I am really happy I got that sleep. It was desperately needed. Today is Friday, however (yay!) and if nothing bad happens at work – fingers crossed – then I can leave earlier and finally start into the weekend with some reading.

Aaaand I’m back on track. I’ve read the next big chapter in Fables, dealing with Rose Red and her past. Rose Red and Snow White were enemies when the series started but only now did I find out just exactly what happened between them. It was a beautiful, sad, disturbing tale that only made Red feel more real. A Gathering of Shadows is also taking its toll. My blood pressure suffered a lot this morning on the commute. This magical tournament that’s finally started is really something. Every scene is so thrilling that I keep holding my breath (not a good idea), so I’m saving the next chapters for later this evening. But I’m confident that I’ll finish these two books – the comic and the current novel – during the read-a-thon. The Raven King also shouldn’t be a problem and I hope to fit Helen Oyeyemi’s collection in there somewhere.


SATURDAY

Total books read:  0
Total pages read:
 ~ 727
Pages read today: ~ 130
Books finished: 
Books I’m reading:

  • Bill Willingham – Jack of Fables: The End (Volume 9)
  • V.E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows

Notes:

Good morning! While our breakfast was frying in the pan, I continued reading, because hey, only two days left in this read-a-thon. Now it’s time to eat, and then I’ll be off into the world of Fables and Fulminate Blades and Dragonslaying once more.

So, I still haven’t finished a book but I’m getting to the end of most of them. Jack and his comic continues to be hilarious and I kind of don’t want his spin-off comics to end. But I am also so very curious how the entire Fables series will end.


SUNDAY

Total books read:  2
Total pages read:
 ~ 917
Pages read today: ~ 190
Books finished: 

  • Bill Willingham – Jack of Fables: The End
  • Bill Willingham – Fables, the Deluxe Edition: Volume 11

Books I’m reading:

  • V. E. Schwab – A Gathering of Shadows
  • Helen Oyeyemi – What is Not Yours is Not Yours

Notes:

Alright, I have finally finished both the last instalment in the Jack of Fables series (which ended… Shakespearan) and the Deluxe Edition of Fables Volume 11. I particularly loved that, after the story, the creators answered fan questions with little comics. In this case, the questions came from celebrity fans and were all things I’d wanted to know as well. Lots of points for this bonus content, I really enjoyed it.

Now back to V. E. Schwab and on to the first story in Helen Oyeyemi’s collection. It’s already Sunday but well, I gotta get started sometime.

Aaaand this concludes the read-a-thon. As expected, work makes it hard to read a lot. But I did catch up on my current book (almost finished), am in the middle of The Raven King audiobook and finished two graphic novels. That’s not a lot, but it is something. On to the next one!