Excellent but kind of unfinished: Benjanun Sriduangkaew – Winterglass

I can’t resist a good fairy tale retelling, especially if it comes wrapped in a cover like this! And at 130 pages, this promised to be a quick read which is good to keep motivation for reading challenges up.

WINTERGLASS
by Benjanun Sridunagkaew

Published by: Apex Book Company, 2017
eBook: 130 pages
Standalone (?)
My rating: 8/10

First sentence: On the night of Nuawa’s execution, she saw the Winter Queen for the first time.

Winterglass is a sci-fantasy about one woman’s love for her homeland (Sirapirat) and her determination to defeat the Winter Queen who has overtaken the land.
The city-state Sirapirat once knew only warmth and monsoon. When the Winter Queen conquered it, she remade the land in her image, turning Sirapirat into a country of snow and unending frost. But an empire is not her only goal. In secret, she seeks the fragments of a mirror whose power will grant her deepest desire.
At her right hand is General Lussadh, who bears a mirror shard in her heart, as loyal to winter as she is plagued by her past as a traitor to her country. Tasked with locating other glass-bearers, she finds one in Nuawa, an insurgent who’s forged herself into a weapon that will strike down the queen.
To earn her place in the queen’s army, Nuawa must enter a deadly tournament where the losers’ souls are given in service to winter. To free Sirapirat, she is prepared to make sacrifices: those she loves, herself, and the complicated bond slowly forming between her and Lussadh.
If the splinter of glass in Nuawa’s heart doesn’t destroy her first.

This book was both a bit of a rush and a pleasure cruise. In the prologue alone, so many details are introduced that don’t make sense yet. The protagonist, Nuawa, just a little girl, is sent into an execution device called a ghost-kiln. But her mother – who is to be executed with her – gives her something to swallow, something sharp and icy, and Nuawa survives.

Nothing much makes sense at first, but throughout the story of (now grown-up) Nuawa, readers get to explore this strange science-fantasy world, in which human souls are used to generate power, where the Winter Queen has conquered formerly lush and warm places and turned them to ice, where nobody seems powerful enough to defeat her. And of course that is Nuawa’s goal. To kill the Winter Queen, who is not only responsible for turning her home into a cold place but for killing her mother as well. But Nuawa is the embodiment of patience. Many assassin’s have failed but Nuawa doesn’t plan to be one of them.

I found this a strange reading experience because it was at once a slow read, focused on character development, and at the same time things happend very quickly, rushing you through the plot to the end – which didn’t really feel like the end of the story, merely a first chapter of something bigger.

But let’s start with the story’s strong points. I loved the world building, maybe even because the reader gets thrown into it and we have to figure things out for ourselves. For Nuawa, having grown up in it, her world is self-explanatory. For us, there are many strange things and customs to discover. It’s a beautifully diverse world, filled with weird little details that enrich the story greatly. In a fight, Nuawa can slice through her oponent’s shadow, inflicting pain (and even death) on them. Sexuality seems very fluid, as well as gender identity – there is a variety of pronouns used for different characters. There are methods, appearing magical but presented as a sort of science, to protect your body against harm, and I found this all highly original and interesting. So discovering this world definitely whetted my appetite for more.

My favorite part, by far, were the characters. Although Nuawa is not exactly someone who warms the heart, her determination and strength mader her into an intriguing protagonist. She pursues her goal at any cost – there was one particularly harrowing scene which demonstrates just how far she will go. It sent shivers down my spain and made me question if I should even like Nuawa. Equally interesting was General Lussadh, the Winter Queen’s best soldier and lover. I could have read a whole book just about Lussadh!
When Nuawa and Lussadh meet, there is an instant spark – which is probably due to them both having one of the Queen’s mirror shards in them, but I like to believe that there’s also a bit of regular old attraction mixed into it. Either way, reading about these two not so different characters was the absolute best.

The story itself is pretty straight forward. Nuawa enters a tournament and wants to battle her way to the top, to become one of the Winter Queen’s soldiers. She hopes that getting close to the Queen, she will get a chance at killing her, ending her country’s enslavement to winter once and for all. And battle, she does! I will not go into detail here, but I found the fight scenes pretty awesome, especially because they show the science-fantasy quality of the book so well.

If you’ve read anything by Sriduangkaew, you know that she’s got a firm grip on language and knows how to use it to great effect. She describes scents and sounds so beautifully to make you feel like you’re there, at the place she’s talking about, standing just next to the protagonist. You can just fall into the story, which is no easy feat when the story is so short. To create a full world on such a little amount of pages is something few authors can do.

But the ending… if you can call it an ending. I do not know, at this point, if this novella is meant as the beginning of a trilogy or series but I sincerely hope so. There is a story arc here, without a cliffhanger. But the story is far from finished. Both Nuawa and Lussadh’s relationship  as well as Nuawa’s quest (and it is a quest!) simply stop at the end of this book, without even a hint of being resolved. My rating of this book depends a lot on whether it is the first part of a series or meant as a standalone. Reading this was pure pleasure but I just want more! If there is more, you can go ahead and add a full point to my rating.

MY RATING: 8/10 – Excellent

Second opinions:

Nnedi Okorafor – Binti: Home

I was far from the only one who fell in love with Nnedi Okorafor’s novella Binti two years ago. Now, the long-awaited sequel has finally arrived and almost lives up to its predecessor. When I started reading it, I thought it would be a sort of standalone novella, but it’s not. In fact, it ends in the middle of the plot, which is the main reason why I didn’t love it as fiercely as I did the first book.

HOME
by Nnedi Okorafor

Published by: Tor.com, 2017
Ebook: 176 pages
Series: Binti #2
My rating: 7,5/10

First sentence: “Five, five, five, five, five, five,” I whispered.

The thrilling sequel to the Nebula and Hugo winning Binti.
It’s been a year since Binti and Okwu enrolled at Oomza University. A year since Binti was declared a hero for uniting two warring planets. A year since she left her family to pursue her dream.
And now she must return home to her people, with her friend Okwu by her side, to face her family and face her elders.
But Okwu will be the first of his race to set foot on Earth in over a hundred years, and the first ever to come in peace.
After generations of conflict can human and Meduse ever learn to truly live in harmony?

As the title suggests, this is the story of Binti coming home after spending a year at Oomza University. This homecoming is fraught with emotion, not only for Binti herself, but for her family, her hometown, and her entire planet.

Binti and Okwu may have found a way to live together in peace, but that doesn’t mean that the rest of the world is quite as open to change. Seeing Binti in her new life as a student was pure joy. Seeing her come home, accompanied by Okwu as the first Meduse allowed on Earth, less so. On the one hand, Binti is still dealing with PTSD from the events that led to her friendship with Okwu and the end of an age-long war. On the other hand, Binti is now confronted with her clashing wishes – being part of her culture, making her family proud, being a Himba, but also wanting to continue her studies, see more of the world, find her own place.

I was a bit surprised that the tension left by Binti’s disappearance took so long to break. At first, her family are simply happy to see their daughter again. And then the shitstorm breaks loose and all the pent-up resentment, jealousy, and condescension rain down upon Binti. And that doesn’t even take into account her new “hair” which seems to have a mind of its own because of her bond with Okwu. In fact, I both loved and hated reading about the reactions to Okwu. You can tell that most people try to be civil, keep an open mind, but that in their hearts, they are either afraid, mistrustful, or straight up hateful toward the Meduse. It made the difference between Binti’s university life and her home town all the more stark.

Home was again filled with beautiful writing, especially when it comes to descriptions of Binti experiencing her home. Whether it’s walking through the desert, showing Okwu the lake, or using maths for meditation – Okorafor makes the most use of her words and manages to build an entire world in less than 200 pages. Skill like that always impresses me in writers. Conjuring up pictures in your readers’ minds is one thing, but doing it in short stories or novellas is quite another and Okorafor got that skill down!

Over the course of this story, Binti has a lot on her plate. At times, I felt like she was being torn apart trying to please everyone but not losing herself in the process. She also learns new things about herself, her family, where she comes from, and where she might want to go. Her travels with her grandmother were lovely to read and expanded the world Okorafor has created for these novellas. I don’t want to give anything away here because discovering these things with Binti was so much fun and you should all experience it for yourselves.

The ending is the one thing that I didn’t love unreservedly because, unlike the first instalment, this book ends on a cliffhanger. Sure, a part of the story is told and there is a definite arc, but just as something really exciting and dangerous happens, the book is over. Had I known this before, I would have waited for the third book to come out, so I could continue reading. But considering that my only gripe with this story is that it ended too soon and that I now have to wait for the sequel, that still leaves an amazing book which tackles big themes without sacrificing story or character. If you haven’t guessed it, I am now eagerly waiting for the third book, The Night Masquerade.

MY RATING: 7,5/10 – Very, very good!

Second opinions:

Matt Wallace – Lustlocked

I just read and adored Matt Wallace’s first Sin du Jour adventure, Envy of Angels. Thanks to the friendly people at Tor.com, I was given a review copy via NetGalley of the second in this (hopefully long) series of hilarious culinary monster stories. It says on Tor.com that books 3 and 4, Pride’s Spell and Idle Ingredients will both be published in 2016. YAY!

lustlocked

LUSTLOCKED
by Matt Wallace

Published by: Tor.com, 2015
Ebook: 224 pages
Series: Sin du Jour #2
My rating: 8/10

First sentence: They aren’t biting today.

Love is in the air at Sin du Jour.
The Goblin King (yes, that one) and his Queen are celebrating the marriage of their son to his human bride. Naturally the celebrations will be legendary.
But when desire and magic mix, the results can be unpredictable.
Our heroes are going to need more than passion for the job to survive the catering event of the decade!

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Holy shit, David Bowie is the actual goblin king!! I’m sorry for that outburst but in Matt Wallace’s world and in this story, the king of the goblins is David Bowie and his singing and acting career is just a fun way to pass the time among us unsuspecting humans. Labyrinth is one of my favorite movies ever and “meeting” its goblin king Jareth again in a story where I really didn’t expect it was just wonderful, especially in the light of Bowie’s recent passing. I giggled with joy and then I almost cried.

Okay, now on to the actual review. The New York catering restaurant Sin du Jour is hired to cater the wedding of the goblin king’s son… so, the goblin prince, I guess. Goblins, apart from not looking the way we’d expect from fantasy stories, have interesting dietary habits which involve lots of precious metals and gemstones. Of course, the Sin du Jour crew have done their very best to create an unforgettable meal for the wedding.

My expectations for this second adventure in Matt Wallace’s hilarious series have been surpassed in some respects, and met in others. Darren and Lena are now official chefs, although still in their probationary period. Darren, other than being gay and much slower in the kitchen than Lena, doesn’t have much personality and he stayed mostly in the background in Lustlocked. I’m totally fine with that – he has potential but there are a lot of other characters that I fell in love with and want to see do stuff all the time.

Lena resolves her tension with sous-chef Dorsky, who is still a little shaken by having lost to her in their knife-fight. You know, because Sin du Jour is that kind of place. When gigantic, horny lizard-monsters attack (read: try to hump everyone to death), Lena and Dorsky have to work together to survive. And we all know how near-death experiences and being forced to cooperate can create a bond between two formerly bickering characters. I get a big fat grin all over my face just thinking about it.

“This giant lizard thing in a tux is trying to bone that dude from Grey’s Anatomy,” Pacific says, totally unfazed. “You know, the one with the hair.”

My other favorite part of Sin du Jour is the stocking and receiving department, consisting of Ritter, badass Cindy, idiot (but lovable) Moon, and Hara. I liked these four right from the start and seeing them on one of their missions is always fun. Ritter also shows aspects of his personality that were only hinted at in Envy of Angels. I am really curious where all of this is going.

Lustlocked – which, by the way, sports another perfect cover and title – also introduces some new characters. Little Dove and White Horse are just the kind of bickering grandpa/granddaughter team I love to read about. So the cast is growing to a considerable size which makes me hope for a novel-sized story about Sin du Jour, sometime in the future.

Also, without spoiling anything, that ending was totally not okay and I need the next instalment or short story or something RIGHT NOW!!! Please, Matt Wallace, and please, Tor.com, give us more of Sin du Jour. These are seriously funny stories with a great cast that plays out like a hilarious action movie in your head. I want more of the same. A lot more!

MY RATING: 8/10 – Excellent!

Bonus short story: SMALL WARS

small warsMy review copy of this novella also included a surprise bonus short story which was just published on Tor.com and which you can read there for free.

It’s a sort of double-prequel, telling – in one timeline – the story of how the stocking and receiving troupe acquires ingredients for the goblin wedding, and in an earlier timeline, how Ritter recruited Cindy, Moon, and Hara to work for Sin du Jour.

The plot wasn’t as funny as the novellas, but it is used instead to shine some light on Moon’s character. I found his actions and words during the crazy battle that invariably ensues to be touching and thought-provoking. Usually, he makes stupid comments, angers Cindy, annoys Hara and Ritter, and is generally a dick. Except there might be some humanity inside him and we get to see it during this trip to Wales. Looking for Welsh gold, the Sin du Jour guys discover the little creatures that live under the earth. And leprechauns are no joke, believe me…

I appreciated this story for the background information and for Moon’s character getting some spotlight. Other than that, it was a usual trip for these guys. Which doesn’t mean it was boring. They don’t do boring at Sin du Jour.

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Second opinions:

Matt Wallace – Envy of Angels

This was SO MUCH FUN! Before I say anything more about this Tor.com novella, let me tell you that if you feel down and you just want a quick adventure with great humor, go pick this up. I’m so excited that a sequel novella is coming out this year.

envy of angels

ENVY OF ANGELS
by Matt Wallace

Published by: Tor.com, 2015
Ebook: 225 pages
Series: Sin du Jour #1
My rating: 7,5/10

First sentence: A hotel room in São Paulo is the third worst place in the world in which to go into cardiac arrest.

In New York, eating out can be hell.
Everyone loves a well-catered event, and the supernatural community is no different, but where do demons go to satisfy their culinary cravings?
Welcome to Sin du Jour – where devils on horseback are the clients, not the dish.

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The Sin du Jour is a New York catering service. For demons. Darren and Lena, two chefs out of work, can’t believe their luck when they are hired by celebrity chef “Bronko” Luck to help out for a big event but when they arrive at Sin du Jour, things are… weird. They’re not allowed to get fresh ingredients themselves because, well, let’s say they don’t only stock meats and vegetables here but also giant killer monsters that want to eat you. Hilarity ensues.

Matt Wallace has written a seriously fun and funny story about a restaurant for the supernaturally inclined. Throwing Darren and Lena into this formerly unknown world is a great way to introduce readers to the craziness that is Sin du Jour. A parallel storyline tells of four Sin du Jour veterans who go out to get more ingredients – and “ingredients” could mean literally anything in this case. I immediately fell in love with the dynamics between stoic Ritter, quick Cindy, Moon, and hulking Hara when they do one of their missions.

The big conflict of Envy of Angels is the fact that, for this big diplomatic meetings between two enemy demon tribes, they are supposed to serve angel. A real coming-from-heaven angel. And while preparing all sorts of wild creatures for demons may have a detrimental effect on your morality code, that is something most people at Sin du Jour feel a bit uncomfortable with. So they need a plan.

Apart from characters with great potential (yay for the sequel!), Matt Wallace is really good at writing funny dialogue and scenes that play out in your head like an action movie. There are a few twists and surprises along the way that always hit the mark and were usually as creepy as they were hilarious. The writing is worksmanlike, the pacing is perfect, this adventure is impossible to put down. I also loved the references to a certain fast food restaurant chain and its famed-for-its-secrecy recipe. And once you read the story, you realise just how perfect that cover is.

This novella also makes me appreciate Tor.com all the more for offering such a variety of stories in their 2015 novella line-up. We’ve had stories with the purplest of prose (Sorcerer of the Wildeeps), urban fantasy about modern small-town witches (Witches of Lychford), a first contact story in space (Binti), a fairy story about changelings (Domnall and the Borrowed Child), the gorgeous perfection that is Angela Slatter (Of Sorrow and Such), and all sorts of other fantasies that I haven’t discovered yet. The often rather dark tales are interrupted by this funny urban fantasy romp that doesn’t take itself too seriously. Tor.com know their readers and they also know we don’t only like one thing. I loved Binti and Witches of  Lychford to bits (nothing needs to be said about Angela Slatter, you know I’d read her shopping list and love it), but I also adored Matt Wallace’s fictional restaurants with its chefs, busboys, and ingredient-hunting crew. Let’s hope Tor.com continue giving us such varied stories in 2016.

MY RATING: 7,5/10 – Excellent fun!

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Second opinions:

Sylvia Spruck Wrigley – Domnall and the Borrowed Child

After a shaky start, the Tor.com novella lineup has been nothing short of excellent. I haven’t read all the titles yet (working on it) but I want to tell you about this new addition which comes out  – drumroll – today! If you’ve been reading big, epic books with ambitious world-building and multi-layered characters, if you just need a break, some time to breathe with a short fun tale, pick this one up.

domnallDOMNALL AND THE BORROWED CHILD
by Sylvia Spruck Wrigley

Published by: Tor.com, 2015
Ebook: 112 pages
Standalone novella
My rating: 6,5/10

First sentence: For centuries – more than that, millennia! – since the beginning of time itself, the fae had celebrated the Spring by finding the bluebells and creating a faerie ring.

The best and bravest faeries fell in the war against the Sluagh, and now the Council is packed with idiots and cowards. Domnall is old, aching, and as cranky as they come, but as much as he’d like to retire, he’s the best scout the Sithein court has left.
When a fae child falls deathly ill, Domnall knows he’s the only one who can get her the medicine she needs: Mother’s milk. The old scout will face cunning humans, hungry wolves, and uncooperative sheep, to say nothing of his fellow fae!

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Domnall doesn’t have it easy. He’s one of the Fair Folk, but few remain that hold with the old ways. Fairies nowadays are scared and careful and hide away under their hill, not like it used to be. But whenever there’s trouble, who do they run to? Domnall, of course. No need to be sneaky and hide from the humans – he’s a fae, after all, and proud of it. They used to run about all over the place, making fairy rings, enchanting humans, drinking fresh dew…

Domnall and the Borrowed Child tells exactly the story you’d expect from the title. Domnall has to exchange the sick Sithein girl for a human child, so the fae can get human mother’s milk – a cure-all for fairy diseases. But of course, things don’t go smoothly. Domnall manages to swap babies somehow but forgets that the human baby, now under the hill among the Sithein, also requires milk or else it will scream its head off. But he can’t exactly milk the mother, so sheep will have to do. And milking sheep is no easy task. Domnall stumbles from one disaster into the next, just trying to do the best he can.

Along the way, he gets help by the young Sithein Micol and I think there were supposed to be romantic undertones in their relationship. I didn’t feel those at all, because to me, Domnall was much, much older than Micol (and he is, 100 years older at least) and so I was rather hoping for a friendship. Domnall’s character is lovable, if somewhat one-dimensional. The plot was fun and quick-moving and adorable in many ways. It also fell a little flat because it was such a straight-forward fairy story. This may very well be my own fault because I have been spoiled rotten with wonderful subversions of fairy tales, lately, so Domnall is not to blame.

I have very little to say about this book, other than that it was cute and I’d totally pick up another of Sylvia Spruck Wrigley’s stories. This wasn’t the kind of story that sticks in your mind, not the kind that makes you think deep thoughts or question the world around you. But it was highly entertaining, a romp through the fairy hills, with a Sithein who’s essential just a good guy with a grumpy exterior. Lovely.

MY RATING: 6,5/10 – Quite good

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Second opinions:

Paul Cornell – Witches of Lychford

It’s funny that I’ve never read anything by Paul Cornell before. I really like the guy, I have listened to every episode of the SF Squeecast, I enjoyed his presentation of the Hugo Awards a few years ago, and I generally like what he has to say on the interwebs. So no pressure, Paul, but I had high hopes for this novella. And it passed with flying colors. I was enchanted and creeped out and just completely enjoying this well-paced, well-written story about three witches.

witches of lychfordWITCHES OF LYCHFORD
by Paul Cornell

Published by: Tor.com, 2015
Ebook: 144 pages
Series: Lychford #1
My rating: 8/10

First sentence: Judith Mawson was seventy-one years old, and she knew what people said about her: that she was bitter about nothing in particular, angry all the time, that the old cow only ever listened when she wanted to.

Traveler, Cleric, Witch.
The villagers in the sleepy hamlet of Lychford are divided. A supermarket wants to build a major branch on their border. Some welcome the employment opportunities, while some object to the modernization of the local environment.
Judith Mawson (local crank) knows the truth — that Lychford lies on the boundary between two worlds, and that the destruction of the border will open wide the gateways to malevolent beings beyond imagination.
But if she is to have her voice heard, she’s going to need the assistance of some unlikely allies…

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Judith Mawson stole my heart on the very first page. The grumpy old lady who is known as a bit of a strange one in her village knows things for what they are. Her banter with her husband, whenever she leaves the house, is charming and shocking at the same time, her view on life and her neighbors completely understandable. I adored Judith from the start and she helped me fall into the story without problems – a welcome change after the first Tor.com novella and I didn’t really hit it off.

 Judith hated nostalgia. It was just the waiting room for death.

Autumn, owner of the local magic shop, is also a bit strange, at least in the eyes of the villagers, and in a town as small as Lychford, everyone has an opinion on everyone else. Cornell managed to convey this feeling of people being up in others’ business really well, without long dialogues or descriptions. It’s just a feeling, floating around in the air, on every page of the novella. Lizzie, Autumn’s old friend, has recently returned to Lychford and the relationship between the two women is fraught, to say the least.

Lizzie takes on the job of reverend in Lychford, something Autumn (who is all about logic and science and doesn’t think much of religion) can’t fully understand. But Lizzie brings her own demons back with her – it is these layers, the fact that each of the three women has a back story, a past, and their own hopes and dreams for the future, that makes the novella so compelling. We learn early on what happened to Lizzie and why she is struggling with her faith. Autumn’s secret comes out only later, and Judith has a big reveal left for the very end.

The plot itself was also solid. On the one hand, a big supermarket is supposed to be built in Lychford, destroying its idyllic life, but offering all sorts of employment to its inhabitants. So the village is divided. All will come down to a final vote. But that’s not all there is to it. If the supermarket is built, the barriers between our world and the fairy worlds will be broken and things will go batshit. Judith knows this. Now she needs to convince Autumn and Lizzie of this fact and get them to help her.

witches of lychford

Witches of Lychford is a charming, enchanting story about a small village, about three women having to work together without having much in common anymore, other than their connection to the Other World. The way they come together, the way the lurking evil is introduced, it was all so wonderfully done I can’t find the right words for it. The pacing was spot on, the characterisation beautiful, and Cornell even managed to break his readers’ heart right there at the end. To pack so much depth into a small novella is nothing short of amazing.

I am so excited that he will revisit the town of Lychford (just found out about this a few days ago) and that I may get to see Judith, Lizzie, and Autumn again. Either way, Paul Cornell is now very high on my to-buy list. The man isn’t just charming on podcasts, he is also a damn fine writer!

MY RATING: 8/10 – Excellent!

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Kai Ashante Wilson – The Sorcerer of the Wildeeps

This was really not my thing. It sounded like my thing, I started like it would be my thing, but then it drifted off into a territory only known as verbose, show-off-ish polysyllabic thesaurus-world. If the plot had been interesting that could have saved the book. As it is, the first of Tor.com’s novellas (I’m still buying and reading all the others) was not a good start to the lineup.

sorcerer of the wildeepsTHE SORCERER OF THE WILDEEPS
by Kai Ashante Wilson

Published by: Tor.com, 2015
Ebook: 224 pages
Standalone novella
My rating: 3,5/10

First sentence: The merchants and burdened camels went on ahead into the Station at Mother of Waters.

Since leaving his homeland, the earthbound demigod Demane has been labeled a sorcerer. With his ancestors’ artifacts in hand, the Sorcerer follows the Captain, a beautiful man with song for a voice and hair that drinks the sunlight.
The two of them are the descendants of the gods who abandoned the Earth for Heaven, and they will need all the gifts those divine ancestors left to them to keep their caravan brothers alive.
The one safe road between the northern oasis and southern kingdom is stalked by a necromantic terror. Demane may have to master his wild powers and trade humanity for godhood if he is to keep his brothers and his beloved captain alive.

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Oh, this sounded so good. “Hair that drinks the sunlight” – yes, please! Demigods abandoned on Earth? Even more yes, please. To be fair, this novella started out really good. Demane is introduced and through him, we meet his caravan brothers, a group of diverse and thoroughly interesting men who I thought I’d love to follow through this story. But then something else happened.

The author frequently loses himself in long rants, filled with big words that I either had to look up or just skimmed over. Demane expresses himself equally but instead of adding a layer to the pretty intriguing world-building, this detracted from the story because it was so inconsistent. One chapter would be written in beautiful prose, not simple, but readable, then suddenly we’d go off on a tangent expressed entirely in words of 5 syllables or more. I didn’t understand the purpose of this and felt very much that the author just wanted to show off how well he knows his language. That’s really cool for you, Mr. Wilson, but it didn’t really work for your story.

So the prose was already a big hurdle for me which, granted, may be due to my not being a native speaker. But I read big books with big words and don’t consider myself to struggle with the language. This was unintelligible at times. Which leads to me still not quite knowing if I missed a part because the language threw me out of the story or because it’s actually missing. There are scenes that are interrupted mid-sentence (which I find pretty cool), there are flashbacks and there are memories, all thrown somewhere in between the continuing main plot. I found it incredibly hard to follow where, in the time-line, I was at any given moment. It was hard to find a red line to follow, to hold on to a character or the plot, because within a matter of paragraphs, I’d be thrown into the past or the future or a tangent memory anyway.

In the Wildeeps, a monster is said to reside, one so terrifying that the toughest of people are afraid of it. The blurb hints at that, and also at Demane possible having to make a sacrifice in order to save his lover, the Captain. I really like that idea, but again, the execution was so confusing and incoherent, I couldn’t even tell you what exactly happened. There is a monster, yes, and it comes with a pretty nice plot twist, but other than that, I couldn’t say I cared about much of anything that happened in this story. This may also be due to the fact that Demane’s relationship with the captain may be mentioned a lot, but we’re not shown enough how these two love each other.

There are so many hints and beginnings of great things here that were simply dropped in favor of purple prose descriptions. I have nothing against big words – hell, my favorite author is Cat Valente and she’s a walking, talking thesaurus – but if they don’t paint pictures, if they don’t add to the story, why put them there? I wanted to learn more about the man whose hair absorbs sunlight for nourishment, about the love between him and Demane, about the other men in the caravan.

Reading this felt more like work than pleasure. I wanted to like this so, so much, and ended up not only bored but actually annoyed at the wasted opportunity. From what I’ve read on the internet, I’m almost alone with that opinion (which is fine, not every book is for everyone and all that), but I can happily declare that the second Tor.com novella, Paul Cornell’s Witches of Lychford charmed the living daylights out of me.

MY RATING: 3,5/10 – Bad

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Second opinions:

Catherynne M. Valente – Speak Easy

I wonder if Cat Valente is even capable of writing  a bad book. It’s getting kind of ridiculous for me to try and write reviews of her stuff. We all know what’s going to happen, anyway. I will gush, I will quote, I will gush about the quotes, and then I’ll tell you how terrible I’ll feel until I can get my hands on the next Valente book. But oh well, each of her books is worth gushing over for different reasons, so I suppose we might as well do it again.

speak easySPEAK EASY
by Catherynne M. Valente

Published by: Subterranean, 2015
Hardcover: 144 pages
Standalone Novella
My rating: 9/10

First sentence: There’s a ragamuffin city out east, you follow?

“If you go looking for it, just about halfway uptown and halfway downtown, there’s this hotel stuck like a pin all the way through the world. Down inside the Artemisia it’s this mortal coil all over. Earthly delights on every floor.”
The hotel Artemisia sits on a fantastical 72nd Street, in a decade that never was. It is home to a cast of characters, creatures, and creations unlike any other, including especially Zelda Fair, who is perfect at being Zelda, but who longs for something more. The world of this extraordinary novella—a bootlegger’s brew of fairy tales, Jazz Age opulence, and organized crime—is ruled over by the diminutive, eternal, sinister Al. Zelda holds her own against the boss, or so it seems. But when she faces off against him and his besotted employee Frankie in a deadly game that just might change everything, she must bet it all and hope not to lose…
Multiple-award-winning, New York Times’ bestselling author Catherynne M. Valente once again reinvents a classic in Speak Easy, which interprets “The Twelve Dancing Princesses” if Zelda Fitzgerald waltzed in and stole the show. This Prohibition-Era tale will make heads spin and hearts pound. It’s a story as old as time, as effervescent as champagne, and as dark as the devil’s basement on a starless night in the city.

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Have you seen The Grand Budapest Hotel? The opening of Cat Valente’s newest novella has a similar feel to it. An unnamed narrator welcomes us into the Roaring Twenties and introduces us to the Hotel Artemisia and some of its inhabitants. Room by room, we find out how half a zoo’s worth of animals ended up in the hotel, how Zelda Fair and her roomates moved in with the already resident pelican, how Al runs the underworld and provides enough booze to keep the entire hotel happy and puking all night, how the rooftop farm makes it possible for people to never go outside and just live in the hotel forever.

In the first few chapters alone, there is so much to discover and the language is so amazing, I just curled up on the couch and soaked it all in. I have come to the conclusion that, while Valente has a trademark lyrical style, she has no trouble whatsoever adapting it. The narration immediately puts you in the time period, the choice of words is exquisite, the dialogue perfectly fitting. You can see the tattered dance shoes and flapper dresses, the bobbed hair and cigarette holders.

“Have you seen Zelda?” he asks.
“Who?”
“Zelda. Zelda Fair. About this high, short black hair, smile like a punch in the gut?”

But Speak Easy is also a heartbreaking story. It starts off as a light, super fun exploration a strangely self-sufficient hotel. Once Zelda – in search of her Goodies, her talent, her one thing that she’s good at – and Frankie, poor bellhop with a secret side-job, are introduced, things get darker. Valente’s love for mythology shines through yet again, and a trip to Artemisia’s basement might well be a trip into the actual underworld. People are what they seem but they are also more than that. And the basement is where they thrive. Zelda’s roomate Ollie can show her talent without hiding behind a pen name, Frankie discovers that he does have great things in him, Zelda can enjoy herself and realise that her Goodies aren’t hiding from her, that she does have talent… there’s booze, there’s sex, there’s dancing all night.

As with most of her books, my number one complaint is that it ends. I fell into its mood right away and wanted to spend more time with the narrator, wanted to ask her about all the other inhabitants of Hotel Artemisia. What about the seals in the fountain? Or the pneumatic tubes? There are entire worlds of intrigues, love affairs, and sinister dealings hiding in there, and we only glimpse some of them. But that’s also one of the book’s qualities. The author doesn’t spell everything out for us, she lets us in on this secret world just a little bit and draw our own conclusions, make up our own side-stories.

quotes greyCaspar Slake has a three-month limit at the bar. Any longer and you start thinking about a person different. You start thinking of them like they’re yours. You start making plans. He didn’t make the rule. It just is. People are clocks who think they wind themselves.

Zelda may be the main character, but I had just as much fun reading about Slake, Artemisia’s owner, and his wife Pearl. The pelican, Mr. Puss-Boots, has a surprising amount of personality and love for his roomates. Al, master of the basement, is surrounded by mystery and power – I completely understand how people can feel drawn to him. He exudes danger as much as he seems to be a benevolent lord in Artemisia’s very own underworld. I loved every character, no matter how little we see of them, and it’s to Valente’s credit that they came vibrantly alive without a lot of exposition.

I don’t think it’s coincidence that Zelda is called Zelda and Frankie – desperately in love with her – is called Frankie. If you have someone named Al run the underworld, it doesn’t take much to add a “Capone” to his name, and if a guy named Francis writes novels, there’s only a small step to supplying the missing “Fitzgerald”. The epic game of poker played in the basement leads me to believe that Valente had these people in mind when she wrote this story.  It made for a great tale and one that twists the knife in your heart at the end, just for good measure. That poker game and its eventual winners are so full of symbols that make a lot of sense when you read up on the Fitzgeralds. It’s really fucking heartbreaking.

As fun as it started, Speak Easy left me half-crying (why does she always do that? I become such a cry-baby when I read Valente books). If you’re invested in Zelda’s dreams – and you will be if you read this – then the ending hurts even more. But other than break my heart again, Valente also reminded me why I love this genre. You can take real-life people and throw them into a world of myth and magic and art, and create something wonderful and new that still feels like coming home. I will definitely put this on my Hugo ballot next year and probably re-read it every weekend until Radiance comes out.

MY RATING: 9/10 – Pretty much perfect

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Second opinions:

Octavia Cade – Trading Rosemary

The Book Smugglers’ review of this novella made me curious when they posted it but it was only after I read one of their Book Smugglers Publishing fairy tale short stories (“The Mussel Eater”) that I realised I had heard the name Octavia Cade before. Once I made the connection from raving review to short story  that I adored, it was a quick decision to buy the novella and give it a shot. My conclusion: The Book Smugglers continue to be a reliable source of amazing fiction and Octavia Cade is a name to watch out for!

trading rosemaryTRADING ROSEMARY
by Octavia Cade

Published by: Masque Books, 2015
Ebook: 82 pages
Standalone
My rating: 8/10

First sentence: Among those who could accurately judge such things, it was generally acknowledged that Rosemary’s library was the finest of its kind in the entire archipelago.

In a world where experience is currency, Rosemary is the owner of a very special library—a library of memory, where scented coins transfer personal experience from one individual to another. When she trades away the sole memory of her grandmother’s final concerto, family opposition, in the form of her daughter Ruth, forces Rosemary to go on a quest to try and recover the lost coin. Yet having to trade away her own memories to get it back, how much of Rosemary will survive the exchange?

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The thing I remembered most about “The Mussel Eater” was Octavia Cade’s tendency to write food porn – gorgeous, mouth-watering, brilliant food porn. She did similar things in Trading Rosemary, although not limiting herself to food but describing all sorts of vibrant memories and experiences.

Rosemary is the proud and happy owner of one of the most valuable libraries in the archipelago. Her coins, each containing a memory and scent, are worth more than you can imagine and will ensure her family’s future. Except Rosemary’s daughter, Ruth, spoiled little brat that she is, doesn’t want anything to do with the memory coins. This daughter is the reason Rosemary sets out on a journey to bring back the coin containing her grandmother’s requiem – which she had traded for another, very rare one. To appease Ruth and have some peace and quiet at home, Rosemary is willing to trade the coin she wants for the coin her daughter demands back.

The author eases her readers into this strange world in the first two chapters. We find out how the memory coins work, read descriptions of the most wonderful scents, and get glimpses of memories that somebody once treasured and someone else might not have cared for. Despite the very strange and scary idea of embedding your own memories into coins, which are then used as currency, I had no problem suspending my disbelief and simply falling into the story.

The bulk of the book tells of Rosemary’s journey to get that damned coin back. The man she traded it to is willing to give it back, but at a high cost. Rosemary must collect nine other coins. One condition of the deal is that Rosemary only use her own memories in exchange for these coins. So chapter after chapter, she hands over memories that range from melancholy to important to heart-breaking to (seemingly) less interesting. Trying to put a price on a personal experience seems like a silly, incredibly subjective thing to do but I’m sure one particular memory will shock other readers just as it shocked me. And what’s more, the question whether Rosemary is still Rosemary after giving away even one single memory. Memories are what makes us who we are (Anybody who has had a case of Alzheimer’s in the family knows just how true this is.) and while leaving one or two childhood memories may not seem like a big deal, it will inevitably change your personality. Maybe just a tiny bit, maybe a lot. Mulling this over in your head was a large part of my enjoyment of this novella.

Even more interesting than their “value” is how these memories slowly paint a picture of Rosemary as a person. On less than 100 pages, drawing a full character is not easy but Octavia Cade succeeds not only in making Rosemary come to life but even the side characters. Ruth – the daughter whom I despise – the people Rosemary trades with, they all feel so real and alive even though we only get to see them for the span of a few pages. It’s a remarkable feat that Cade pulls off without giving up some of her descriptions of smells and foods or the mood of a day by the sea. It goes to show just how powerful personal memories are. One single glimpse into an important moment of a life can be so very telling. I enjoyed how every memory evoked different feelings. Some where shocking, some lovely, others disconcerting. They all advanced the plot, however, and developed the characters.

I thought I had the ending all figured out. According to me, it could go one of two ways – I got half of it right, but I could’t have foreseen what comes after. The fact that it shattered my heart the way it did is yet more proof of Octavia Cade’s talent. Not only did I get attached to Rosemary as a character (even though she is mostly remote and somewhat cold) but to her coins as well. I didn’t want to give away a single of her memories and watched in horror as she had to give up other people’s memories.

I loved the style so much that I immediately bought Cade’s newer novella The Don’t Girls. Her ideas are original, her prose is gorgeous, she plays with my emotions as if I were her puppet – and I loved it! I’ll be watching closely for anything new she publishes. Maybe one day, I’ll even get a big, fat novel.

RATING:  8/10 – Excellent

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Andy Duncan & Ellen Klages – Wakulla Springs

Though written by a man-woman-team, I am counting this book towards my 2014 Women of Genre Fiction Challenge – seeing as I’ve never read anything by Ellen Klages (nor Andy Duncan, for that matter). You can read this Hugo nominated novella for free at tor.com – head over there and read it now, while it’s hot outside.

wakulla springsWAKULLA SPRINGS
by Andy Duncan and Ellen Klages

Published by: Tor.com, 2013
Ebook: 139 pages
Standalone Novella
My rating: 8/10

First sentence: Wakulla Springs. A strange and unknown world, this secret treasure lies hidden in the jungle of northern Florida.

Wakulla Springs, in the deep jungle of the Florida panhandle, is the deepest submerged freshwater cave system in the world. In its unfathomable depths, a variety of curious creatures have left a record of their coming, of their struggle to survive, and of their eventual end. And that’s just the local human beings over the last seventy-five years. Then there are the prehistoric creatures…and, just maybe, something else.

Ranging from the late 1930s to the present day, “Wakulla Springs” is a tour de force of the human, the strange, and the miraculous.

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“Wakulla Springs” was wonderful. That needs to be said before anything else. But I am still debating whether it qualifies as speculative fiction. There is no magic, unless you count the magic of film-making, there are no otherworldly monsters, unless you count costumed movie stars. But the atmosphere of the hot Florida air, the piney forests, the springs themselves, and what draws Mayola and Levi into the water, is so gripping that it brings a sort of magical feeling to the table.

The book is sectioned into several parts but for the sake of keeping this spoiler-free I’ll stick mostly to the first two. Mayola is a young black girl saving up money for college. She finds work in the Wakulla Springs Lodge – a whites-only hotel that pays their staff excellently – and through this summer job witnesses a movie crew shooting Tarzan. People of color aren’t allowed to swim in the springs but Mayola wants nothing more than to cool down in the still, clear water.

Needless to say, with a story set in the 1930s and a black protagonist, racial issues are front and center. But the authors handle them with a light touch and never the issues take over the plot. Mayola – and later Levi – has to face injustice on a daily basis and while I gasped at certain scenes, Mayola has grown up in that time and so doesn’t dwell on it too long.

The development thorughout the novella is wonderfully done. Not only does each character evolve, but since every part shows us a new generation of people living near or involved with Wakulla Springs, we get to follow how society’s views have changed. When Mayola thinks of swimming in the springs (secretly, at night) she is filled with fear at being caught, of losing her job. Levi, in the second part, knows fully well he isn’t allowed to swim there, but he does it anyway and doesn’t give it too much thought. When a black war veteran returns home, he fully expects to be treated like a hero regardless of his skin color. In yet another, later part, we follow a young black woman writing a paper for university – and the difference between her and Mayola’s dreams of saving up money and maybe, just maybe going to college is astounding. All of this is done without exposition. Through the characters we get a sense of time and political views. In a novella where racial discrimination happens all the time, the sudden lack thereof feels almost loud – in a good way, that is.

But the story is as much about the place as it is about the characters. Through Mayola and Levi, the readers get a glimpse of the local (and other) superstitions, traditions, and a feel for the time period the story is set in. The heat is almost tangible, the smell of the trees and the constant threat of alligators makes this an entirely engrossing read. I spent my Sunday afternoon with this book and the weather outside was just perfect. I’m sure this book is enjoyable when you read it in winter, but there is something about the sun on your face, sweat trickling down the back of your neck, and characters that are experiencing a similar kind of heat.

“Wakulla Springs” is, without a doubt, an excellent book. It is beautifully written, has engaging characters, and builds up such atmosphere that you can’t put it down. I was provided an ebook version of this novella in the Hugo Voter Packet so, naturally, I am considering how to rate it for the award. As much as I loved reading it, I fail to see the speculative fiction aspects of the story. It is a coming-of-age story, it’s about race and film-making, and women, and dreams, and very personal superstitions. But except for one little scene that can be explained away in a sentence or two, and pass as mainstream, and maybe the very last paragraph, there isn’t a single thing that qualifies it as fantasy or science fiction. I’m considering my votes well and will definitely rate this novella high. But simply because I feel it’s been classified as the wrong genre, it won’t make the top of my list. (It’s really not that hard to guess who gets my #1 novella vote…)

RATING: 8/10 – Excellent

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