Reading the Hugos: Best Novel

What a ballot! When the nominees were announced, I had already read four of the six nominated novels and I thought I was doomed. How was I supposed to choose my favorites among these excellent books? Couldn’t there at least be two or three that weren’t as good? Well, I’m all caught up and while the ballot is still filled with fantastic books, at least I know somewhat how to arrange my list now.

The nominees for Best Novel

  1. Catherynne M. Valente – Space Opera
  2. Naomi Novik – Spinning Silver
  3. Yoon Ha Lee – Revenant Gun
  4. Mary Robinette Kowal – The Calculating Stars
  5. Rebecca Roanhorse – Trail of Lightning
  6. Becky Chambers – Record of a Spaceborn Few

At this moment, I’m certain about my number one spot and the bottom two spots. But the three books in between could switch places a hundred times before the voting period ends. Because I just don’t know! They are incredibly difficult  to compare, they did such different things, they were all brilliant, and I really don’t know at this point what my final ballot will look like.

Cat Valente’s Space Opera is my number one for several reasons. First, I have adored Valente’s writing for years, she has never let me down, and while I think she should have won a Hugo already for Radiance, I believe this book is just as deserving. Humorous science fiction is rarely taken into consideration for awards so I don’t believe it will win. But when you pick up a book that everybody has compared to Douglas Adams’ Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy and it doesn’t let you down? That’s already a winner for me. I mean, who could stand up to that comparison and come out not just with “yeah it was okay” but with a nominateion for a Hugo Award?  Valente not only made me laugh out loud with the premise – Eurovision In Space – and the hilarious invasion scene as well as many silly moments, she also showed her originality with the alien species she invented. And, most of all, the story is full of heart and a deep love of humanity, warts and all. I can’t remember the last time a book made me laugh and feel all warm and fuzzy inside like this. If Redshirts can win, than Space Opera should have a chance as well! I sincerely hope it does.

Naomi Novik’s Spinning Silver was a beautiful book. It suffered from too many unorganized POV characters and it wasn’t quite as good as Uprooted but that’s about all the negative things I can say about it now. I adore fairy tale retellings (as you may have guessed if you stop by here occasionally), so I’m putting it in second place for now. Novik turned a Rumpelstiltskin retelling into an epic fantasy, which is already a feat, but she also created memorable characters and great romances – I know many people didn’t like them, but I stand by my minority opinion.

Yoon Ha Lee’s Revenant Gun concludes the Machineries of War series. In order to read this, I had to first catch up on the second volume, which suffered from middle-book-syndrome a lot. This, however, was a worthy and exciting finale to an epic series. It started with a bang, made me think I knew where it was going, turned the other way, then swerved around yet again. It was clever, had great characters (Jedao must be one of my top ten characters ever!) and a satisfying ending. Seriously well done. I can’t wait for whatever Yoon Ha Lee publishes next.

Mary Robinette Kowal’s The Calculating Stars is easily the best novel of hers I’ve read. It was thrilling, despite being so character-focused and lacking in space battles. It made me uncomfortable and excitied and angry all at the same time. I loved that the protagonist lived in a stable, happy marriage, I loved how the book dealt with mental health issues. There were so many things I loved about it. And seeing how it won a Nebula Award, I wasn’t the only one. As I’m having such a hard time ranking these books, I’m going to use that win as an excuse to rank it a bit lower. It’s already won an award, after all, and while there have been several books that won both Hugo and Nebal awards in the same year, I didn’t think this book was quite amazing enough for that.

Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning was on the bottom spot of my ballot for a long time. Not because it’s bad but because it was too ordinary for an award. A fun Urban Fantasy story in an original setting may be entertaining to read, and I did enjoy how Native American mythology gets woven into the plot, but I still don’t think this book deserves an award. Many, many other books are published every year that do the same thing: sassy, kick-ass heroine solves mystery while working through her dark past, meeting potential love interest, betrayal, battles, magic, etc. etc. Neither the writing nor the characters were good enough for me to want to give this an award.

However, Becky Chambers’ Record of a Spaceborn Few, which I expected to love, goes even below that (for now). In reality, this book was better written than Trail of Lightning, but it had absolutely no plot for such a long time that I kept asking myself why I was even reading it. It’s the equivalent of a married couple discussing who’s going to do the dishes tonight… except in space. For a few hundred pages! Although once the plot does start (very late in the novel), the book becomes really, really good, by then I was too fed up already with the hours I’ve spent reading about nothing (in space).

So this is it, my Best Novel ballot. I may yet switch the bottom two novels around, depending on how my feelings change in the next month or so. I may also change my mind about my slots 2 through 4, but for now, I’m okay with the way I ranked these books.

I’m sure everyone has their own way of deciding how to rank a certain book. As I’m not a professional critic, all I have to go on is my own enjoyment of any given book. And – as was the case here – if I enjoyed many of the books, I try and find other criteria such as originality, writing style, potential for rereading, etc. For example, I’ll probably never reread The Calculating Stars because although it was a very good book, it was not exactly a fun book, but I may give Spinning Silver another go and I will most definitely reread Space Opera someday. It’s a total comfort read.

How about you guys? Are you voting for the Hugos this year? Do you agree/disagree with my list? Let me hear your thoughts in the comments! 🙂

Overhyped but a lot of fun: Rebecca Roanhorse – Trail of Lightning

Ah, here it is again. The dreaded post-hype disappointment of what is generally a very good book. Roanhorse’s debut novel has been one of the buzziest publications of 2018, so despite my dislike for Urban Fantasy, I decided to give it a go. I was well entertained and would sum this up as “a lot of fun” but I don’t really understand what the hype is about or why it’s supposed to be such a groundbreaking work of fiction.

TRAIL OF LIGHTNING
by Rebecca Roanhorse

Published by: Saga Press, 2018
Ebook: 287 pages
Series: The Sixth World #1
My rating: 7,5/10

First sentence: The monster has been here.

While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters.
Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last—and best—hope. But what Maggie uncovers about the monster is much larger and more terrifying than anything she could imagine.
Maggie reluctantly enlists the aid of Kai Arviso, an unconventional medicine man, and together they travel to the rez to unravel clues from ancient legends, trade favors with tricksters, and battle dark witchcraft in a patchwork world of deteriorating technology.
As Maggie discovers the truth behind the disappearances, she will have to confront her past—if she wants to survive.
Welcome to the Sixth World.

Maggie Hoskie is, apart from her cultural heritage, your average Urban Fantasy heroine. Instead of the depressed, alcoholic and antisocial private detective, you get a depressed, antisocial monsterhunter with superpowers. She’s not the sassy kind of UF heroine that permeates so many werewolf-and-vampire stories, but I still didn’t find her to be very interesting as a character. Dealing with the consequences of her powers and things that happened in her past makes her multi-layered, sure, but again, nothing I haven’t seen before. Doesn’t every Urban Fantasy heroine have demons in her past, people she’d like to forget, or people she’d like to meet again? It’s no less intriguing for having done a million times before, but it has been done a million times before.

So while I didn’t dislike Maggie, I also didn’t particularly like her. She is stubborn to a fault, she is smart, but sometimes overestimates her own cleverness, she mistrusts everyone (which is not a bad thing given her occupation). She doesn’t let anyone get close to her but at the same time yearns for family and a place to belong. I may not have liked her all that much, but she did make for a compelling main character and I’d much rather have someone like her than a Mary Sue. All this  is quite different from how I felt about Kai, the mysterious, handsome medicine man who travels with her. Again, it’s obvious from the start that he is the main romantic interest. These two are thrown together by circumstance, have to work closely with each other and that means going into dangerous situations, saving each others lives and – naturally – growing closer. Again, I have nothing against that and I adored Kai whose sense of humor brought some light into this rather dark story. But it is still just a tired old trope – a well-done way, absolutely, but nothing new.

The writing was good, but  nothing groundbreaking (you see a pattern yet?). The exact same goes for the plot. Everything needed for a fun romp is there. The characters are fleshed-out enough to care about them, the pacing is on point, the things that happen are thrilling and keep you turning pages, the fights had me at the edge of my seat. But that doesn’t change the fact that it’s basically Buffy in a cool new setting with cool new monsters. There’s even a plot twist at the end (which I found to be quite well done) and then a bit of a cliffhanger (which I didn’t like so much).

Now the world-building is where it’s at, as it is the only aspect of this book that I found to be truly fresh and original. Based on Native American mythology, you get to read about monsters you (probably) haven’t read about before. No werewolves or vampires in sight! In fact, because the Big Water has destroyed most of the US, Navajo culture is now dominant, so every person Maggie and Kai meet, every place they visit, has a distinctive flair to it that was incredible fun to explore. There is still so much to discover because although the groundwork has been laid – the Big Water destroyed most of the US, Dinétah rose and with it, its gods and monsters, resources are scarce, it’s all very Mad Max: Fury Road but different enough to be exciting! We know some people are born with clan powers which can be anything from mind reading to super strength, we know there are witches and immortals… Roanhorse gave me just enough to always make me want more but she also always gave me the feeling that, yes, there is more and she knows it. Whether that’s true or not, it feels like the author has her world fully planned out, like she has a bigger plan that she’s following with the series. Dinétah is definitely a world I want to see more of, so despite disagreeing with the hype, I will probably read the sequel.

I realize I made this sound worse than it is. I’m nitpicking because I tried really hard to understand the hype and simply can’t. Apart from the setting and the characters, I found nothing in this book to be new or groundbreaking. But reading it was actually a lot of fun. You can breeze right through it, be thoroughly entertained, and then want more of the same. I wouldn’t put it on an awards ballot but I would put it into my friends’ hands. Because who doesn’t like a fun thrill ride through a post-apocalyptic world, hunting monsters and discovering mysteries?

MY RATING: 7,5/10 – Very good!